Thursday, May 23, 2013

Waiter, Waiter, Percolator..... I Love Coffee, I Love Tea, I Love Corningware and It Loves Me

If you have followed any of my Coffee Talk posts over on Culinary Alchemy, you are probably aware of my distaste for percolated coffee.  Even though it's not my "cup of tea", as it were, I still feel that all implements of coffee brewage should be treated with love and respect.  Thus, you can imagine my distress when I found this at the Salvation Army.....

A Corningware 10-cup Electromatic Percolator (most of which were recalled due to an epoxy problem that allowed the pyroceramic pot to separate from the upper portion that the handle is attached to) Even if it's too dangerous to use, it's still a great collector piece.

Oh, it looks all clean and wonderful on the outside, even the heating element and the basket were in pristine condition; however, I was deeply horrified by the internal condition of the pot.... Especially since Corningware is so easy to clean.  This poor percolator had obviously suffered some serious abuse and neglect... Years of it, apparently.

I felt it was my solemn duty to adopt it and give it a loving home.  (and, more than likely, several years of therapy)

It was a great struggle, but after a scrubbing with soap and water, a second scrubbing with Weiman's Glass Cooktop Cleaner......

2 brew cycles with bleach water,

1 cycle of distilled Vinegar, 2 brew cycle with "Awesome"........



and finally...  and 2 brew cycles with Oxyclean... (1/4 cup, 10 cups water and let it perk without the lid on so I could keep the foam in check) This was the final result on the inside (oh, and I ran distilled vinegar through it again, after the Oxyclean).....

As good as new, or so I thought.  I noticed that there was something dripping down the side from under the "Oh, So Sleek and Retro" chrome trim.

This made me curious... So I unscrewed the handle and unclipped the trim.... THIS is what I found underneath.....

I almost lost my lunch.  BLECH!!!!!  Now this is not all the previous owners fault.  It is a P23-P Electromatic Percolator, which put's it somewhere in the early to mid 60's, so it IS fairly old (like 40-50 years old) and what was underneath the chrome trim wasn't coffee, it was years and years of accumulated kitchen grease.  So, unless the previous owner had torn the whole thing apart, they would not have known that the build up was there.

Needless to say, it is now immaculately clean,

and the whole thing is put back together.... 

Maybe I should start a non-profit organization dedicated to Corningware Rescue......

Where is your Corningware??  (Mine is safely tucked into bed)  ;)
~~

19 comments:

  1. Love all of these new posts and the pictures!!! I have the same pot, but without the plug. I use it to store iced coffee in the fridge :)

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  2. That is an EXCELLENT idea! And it would prevent the epoxy from disintegrating with repeated heating. :)

    I am still attempting to make coffee with it. Just for fun... mind you. I move it to a thermal carafe after it's done so as to not put too much repeated stress on the handle.

    So far I have managed to make coffee flavored water, and mud. There has got to be a happy medium in there somewhere... LOL

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  3. Just a quick suggestion on cleaning. Bon Ami powder works wonders at removing coffee/tea stains, whether on Corning Ware or anything else. Just dump some (a lot in this case!) in the pot/cup to be cleaned and then pour over some steaming hot water. let sit until the water has cooled enough to stick your hands in and scrub and then scrub gently with a non-scratch pad. Repeat if necessary, though I've never had to do this.

    Now I know that pot was truly covered in coffee stains but still wanted to put it out there.

    I'm a bit late with this comment but just stumbled across it now :) Great blog!

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  4. just discovered your blog today. Love it!! these are great items and it is nice to see how to care for or restore them.

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  5. You really restored it to its former glory. That is the way my husbands grandfathers cup looked, he would not allow his cup to be washed, said it would ruin the taste of his coffee! Now that he is gone I guess I can confess to washing it before I knew the rules, as I pulled it out of the dish water to rinse it I heard a collective gasp from family members. I guess it is a good thing he wasn't there to see what I had done.

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  6. Can that process get rid of a basement smell?

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  7. Honestly, the Corningware Pyroceramic material should not absorb any odors. So if there is a "basement" smell, it's more than likely coming from the plastic parts. THAT, I can only suggest soaking in a baking soda solution. That being said, while I realize that the heating element is submersible, I do not know how much of the plastic is safely allowed to get wet. The lid, I am assuming would be OK, but the part that connects to the cord, I am not so sure about.

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  8. I am wondering where I can possibly get a cord for the 10 cup that is pictured above. I located this one in perfect condition but does not have the cord. Any suggestions?

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    1. This particular model is the P-23-EP which uses a standard appliance cord (unlike the later models which had proprietary cords) So any ACE hardware store should have a compatible cord.

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  9. I have recently stumbled onto one exactly like the above . Do you have a suggestion on where to obtain a cord for it?

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  10. There are so many "Oxy Clean" products on the market these days. Can you clarify which one you used?

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    1. I used the Oxy Clean powder that you use in the Washing Machine. :)

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  11. I found one of these (stovetop, though) at a resale store. I was pretty excited as it is in pristine condition. When I put it on the stove top and tried to make coffee with it though it never actually perculated. The water came to a boil but never came up through the stem. Any idea what I might be doing wrong? patriciacmcbride@yahoo.com

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    Replies
    1. The pump stem may be clogged and preventing the water from perking through it.

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  12. Thank you so much for posting this. I bought a 6 cup Blue Cornflower teapot at a thrift store that looked in relatively good shape. I did not realize how stained it was inside. I tried everything from soap, baking soda, BKF, Weisman Cooktop cleaner, Vinegar, etc. The OxiClean did the trick. Boiled the water with the OxiClean in it, cut the heat and let it sit overnight. It was pristine when I checked this morning. Not a sign of any of those nasty stains.

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  13. Thank you so much! I wanted to use a 6 cup stove top too and has the same stains. So handy for power outages if you have a gas stove. It can still be ignited with a long lighter in case of power outage. Can't do that with all our cup makers!

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  14. How did you get the handle and trim off?

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    1. I removed the screw in the handle... That is only possible with the P-23-EP model. All subsequent models (P-6-EP, P-206-EP, P-406-EP, P-80-EP, P-280-EP, P-480-EP and E-1210) have a prefabricated handle assembly and cannot be removed without damaging the percolator.

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