Saturday, August 17, 2013

A Tale of Two Skillets - Corningware Electromatic Skillets

So I thought it might be fun to talk about the Electromatic skillets.  Notice I pluralized skillets.  Cause there were 2 versions.  Actually there were 3, but the first 2 are pretty much the same so I guess this is really a Tale of 2 1/2 Skillets.

The Electromatic Skillet was first released in 1962 along with Corning's first automatic percolator (P-23-EP).  The  Electric Warming Trays (P-49 and P-54) would be released about a year or two later.

This P-12-ES originally came with your choice of a Black Trefoil or Cornflower P-16-B skillet with a flatter bottom than the standard Corning Ware (Similar to the solid white cookware that was available with the "Counter that Cooks" range) known as a P-22-B.  These "Hot Plates" were made of Pyroceram covering a ribbon element that reached 425 degrees.

Since Corning tends to think of "everything" they even offered cooking temperature suggestions down the side.

This thermostatically controlled cooking was a big success.  To me, the leg/handle assembly side is strikingly similar in its 60's modern design to the legs on the Farberware Open Hearth Grill. Ah, Bakelite at it's finest.

There only downfall is that their use is restricted to only Corning Ware products. (no metal pots, please)

Later, around 1966, other patterns became available...  The Platinum Filigree Gift line added a P-86 Dutch Oven, the 1969 began the "Floral Bouquet" P-22 Skillet run; as all three editions were available, for a short amount of time.  Plain/Just White was added as well.

A PDF version of the Use & Care booklet from 1963 can be found -->Here<--

In 1972 along with the release of the "A" series Corning Ware, the Electromatic skillet got a slight update (v1.5).  The original version (seen above) was still in production, but the black handles did not extend quite as far over the cooking surface, leaving a slightly larger area between the handles so the new straighter sided "A" series skillets would fit.  These modified versions can be identified by the model number of the base being suffixed by a "-N" as in P-12-ES-N.  For these newer model bases, the A-22-B fits between the black handles.  (I wish I had one of these slightly newer models, but I do not)  Spice o' Life, Cornflower, All White and 3rd edition Floral Bouquet were the available as patterns.

By 1973 there was a new comer to the Electromatic line.  The E-1310 Electromatic Table Range.

It's styling was "NEW" and definitely different from the previous model, though it performed the same functions.  Th E-1310 was basically a small version of the "Counter that Cooks" drop in cook tops that had been released in the previous decade.  (Yes, in truth there is nothing really "new" about our modern "radiant" cook tops... It's already been done.)  Unlike the older version of the Electromatic skillet, however, this one could handle other cookware not of the Corningware persuasion.  (This was the one my mom had while I was growing up)  Meaning, you could use regular metal pots and pans on it.  In fact, it was even advertized that you could simply cook anywhere with it, including the middle of your dining room table.  It also reached a higher temperature, being 500 degrees instead of the previous model's 425 degrees.

The E-1310 came with a "Just White" A-22-B skillet with A-10-C lid, the only other pattern option I am aware of was Spice o' Life.  Gone was the classic black and white 60's mod leg/handles in lieu of brushed chrome trim and faux wood grain.  But the cooking surface area is larger, so if you are in possession of a P-16-B Chicken Fryer, your back in business with the new model.  Another handy change was that the cord was removable...

The P-12-ES & -N had a permanent cord that made storage a bit of an exercise in creative cord wrapping.

The P-12-ES-N and the E-1310 were both available for a short time before the P-12-ES-N was pulled from the market in favor of the newer E-1310.  Alas, even with the improvements to this "Table Range", all Electromatics were removed from the market in 1976, including the warming tray and the percolators.

I absolutely love my P-12-ES, and use it as my slow cooker, with my P-34-B 4 quart Dutch oven.  But I will always have a soft spot for the later Table Range (E-1310).  That is the one mom had when I was a kid and she used it religiously for making Chicken Fettuccine Alfredo.  YUM! 

Thanks to Trent, I have received a scan of the E1310 Electromatic Table Range booklet.  I have loaded the PDF file  to Google Drive

Where is your Corningware??
~~

20 comments:

  1. I am really enjoying reading your posts about CorningWare.

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  2. Shane, thanks for this post as I was wondering about these skillets. A few months back I saw the newer E1310 at a garage sale with a spice of life casserole selling for 5 dollars. The casserole looked new and the E1310 was still working. My garage sale shopping companions talked me out of buying it. I even had my 5 bucks out of my wallet and ready to give. Now I wish I hadn't been so easily persuaded against buying the purchase. It even had the original box and everything.

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  3. Thanks Patti! I enjoy writing them, it makes me feel all nostalgic cause Grandma and Mom use to use their Corningware all the time. Which reminds me, I think it's time that I stopped posting about pieces, and started posting some more recipes. LOL

    daeira... I know the feeling, I just passed up another of the first models for $5.00, though it didn't have a skillet with it, it was only the base. I didn't get it, cause I already have one, but I kind of which I had picked it up so I could give it to one of by brothers, or my Aunt.

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  4. Thank you for the wonderful and helpful post on the two skillets.



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  5. I love your blog. I'm new to Corningware, but have amassed quite a few pieces. I'm considering getting a modern slow cooker, but would rather use Corningware if possible. Would this be safe to leave on when you're not home?

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  6. Greetings anchovylove, Thank you, and welcome! I use my P-12-ES original model with either my P-84 (4 quart Sauce Pot) or P-34 (4 quart Dutch Oven) pieces as a slow cooker, but only when I am at home. If you would like to use it while you are away, I would go for the newer model Table Range... the E-1310. Simply because it has a lower temperature (200F) versus the original, which starts at 250F degrees.

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  7. Some years ago (35+) my partner and I purchased a E1310 table top range at J.J. Newberry's (yes, I said Newberry's). However, the manual for it has been lost over the years. Have tried finding an electronic version of it but to no avail. Any recommendations?

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  8. Occasionally the mauals will show up on eBay. That is how I secured the one I have for my P-12-ES. Though I will admit, I have not seen one for the table range as of yet.

    Thank you for reminsing me though; I have been intending to scan the manual that I have and post it publicly to Google Drive. I scanned the crock pot manual, then went on vacation and lost my momentum.

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  9. Hi Shane,
    I purchase One of these skillet at a garage sale today for $2 and I wanted to know if there is any way I could get a copy of your manual I'm willing to pay for the shipping or the postage the copying of it because I'm very curious of using this I did not know what it was before hand thanks Missy

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    1. or maybe you could email me it thanks again Missy

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  10. awesome post! answered my questions regarding if I could use anything other than Corningware on the p12 and now I am in search of a 1310 at my nearby thrift stores as I pop in and out of there on a near weekly basis. if you could scan that manual and share with us o_m_g would be so grateful. since these work on 110 I found it very helpful when camping and while I can cook on the propane stove in a travel trailer I find it much more accurate to cook off the 110 voltage utilizing the campsites included electricity rather than using up a propane especially on a cold night it somewhat of an inconvenience when you run out of the propane for the heater and hot water heater. these are so nice to keep your side dish warm While finishing cooking the rest of the meal rather than zapping them in the microwave ugh. also great for keeping the mashed potatoes gravy and other side dishes warm in the middle of the dinner table throughout dinner time and especially during thanksgiving and other holiday feasts :)

    anyhow I broke my first p12 a month ago during camping, I believe from attempting to boil water in a stainless steel. it is quite possible that the element got hot prior to introducing the pot of water on top thus creating a hot cold shock effect hence cracking the pyroceram covering to bits. I was a bit upset over having destroyed a piece of history. but I did manage to pick up a new one or replacement rather at a nearby thrift shop in perfect condition for only $8 so now I'm very happy big smile. and from this point on will use corning ware only items on it. Thanks again for the awesome informative and most helpful post :-)

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  11. Thank you for your informative post! Answered all of my questions regarding my newly acquired E-1310 yard sale find today. $3!!!! In like new condition. I know I will be using it for a lot of different things!

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  12. Thank you for your informative post! Answered all my questions regarding my newly acquired E-1310 a great yard sale find today at $3!!! In like new condition manufactured 10/74, I'm sure I will be using this a lot in the future.

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  13. This item appears to be what is keeping our economy spinning at the grass roots/yard sale level. Thank goodness!
    Anyway, I too (just moments ago) acquired my P-12-ES in a neighbor's sale. Please, please, please locate your momentum and proceed to the posting of the manual to Google Drive!
    As soon as I read your super informative retrospective and the attendant discussion, I promptly downloaded and searched GD...in vain.
    I will not bate my breath, but will maintain close surveillance until I can lay my hands on the manual.
    Thank you for sharing your CW passion with the rest of us pyrex maniacs.

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    1. I have gotten my hands on a scan of the E1310 Table Range booklet, thanks to a fellow reader, Trent. It has been uploaded to Google Drive and set to public. The link is located towards the end of this post.

      Once I get my scanner working again, I shall endeavor to complete the scans of the original P-12-ES Electromatic Skillet booklet as well as the booklet that was produced with the Skillet/Dutch oven set (P-86)

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  14. Shane, I don't see any mention of not using metal pans in the instruction booklet. Is his prohibition something that you learned by experience?

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    1. It had to do with how the E-1310 was marketed... There was an advertisement stating "Now you can use your metal pans as well as Corning Ware Pyroceram dishes". My natural assumption is that previous models (P-12-ES & P-12-ES-N) were not meant for use with metal pans. There does seem to be a difference in the material used for the heating surface of the E-1310 Table Range versus the original P-12-ES material.

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  15. I see the E-1310 Manual says not to use aluminum foil on its surface. I assume it's because it will stain? Can I use Disposable Foil Pads on it?

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  16. I meant Disposable Foil PANS, not pads :)

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